Heroin Addiction and Withdrawal

Article by Larry Burns

If you are suffering from heroin addiction, you are not alone and it is never too late to get help. According to the National Institutes of Health, nearly 4 million people have used heroin at some time in their lives. If you are addicted to heroin, it is time to seek help and quit damaging your health and your relationships.

Advanced heroin addiction treatment centers devoted to neuroscience technology and integrated care are available to help you through your withdrawal and recovery. New state of the art technology can address heroin addiction and its effects on your body as a whole including the physical, emotional, psychological, and neurological factors of heroin addiction.

Physical dependence on heroin results in many physical symptoms during withdrawal. The more someone uses heroine and the stronger the tolerance they have built to the drug, the more severe the physical withdrawal symptoms can be after the person last uses heroin. Some physical withdrawal symptoms may include: sweating, nausea and vomiting, cold or clammy feeling with goose bumps, stomach pains and diarrhea, running nose, restlessness, insomnia, and muscle pains in the arms and legs. Essentially, heroin withdrawal feels like a very bad case of the flu. Major symptoms will usually peak within 48 to 72 hours after last use. Thereafter, mild symptoms may continue for a week or more. In unique cases, withdrawal symptoms can last months.

During withdrawal, addicts will also have a very strong craving for more of the drug, which is why it is particularly hard for someone addicted to heroin to kick the habit without professional help. In addition, for heavy, chronic users, and users who are in poor health, withdrawal symptoms can be fatal if not watched under the care of a licensed professional who can monitor heart rate, temperature, blood pressure, and other vital signs. In most cases though, heroin withdrawal is considered less dangerous than alcohol withdrawal.

During medical detoxification from heroin, your physician will likely prescribe you medication to help minimize your withdrawal symptoms. Methadone has been popularly used for more than 30 years to assist with heroin withdrawal symptoms and recovery. Buprenorphine is a fairly new drug treatment approved within the last ten years. Those who use buprenorphine experience fewer withdrawal symptoms than those who use methadone but buprenorphine does not work with all patients. Your doctor can help you decide what is best for you.

Take positive action now. Find an advanced drug and rehab treatment center today and you can be on your way to a successful and sustainable recovery from heroin addiction.

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